Breitling Chronomat Blackbird A44359 Luxury Watch Review

Breitling for Bentley this is *not.* The Breitling Chronomat Blackbird cuts a distinctive but discreet profile. With a combination of 44mm diameter and elegant brushed stainless steel, the Chronomat Blackbird certainly is *built* like a Bentley, but this bird‘ checks the outlandish „bling“ at the curb.

Call it a muscular alternative to an Omega Speedmaster.

Breitling’s Chronomat Blackbird, based on the Chronomat Evo platform, ran from 2007 to 2011, and the watch is best described as an all-around sports watch with upscale credentials.

First and foremost, the tank-like Breitling case deserves a shout-out; when placed in a watchmaker’s water testing chamber, this type of Breitling case (conservatively rated to 300 meters) requires a special „non compressible hard case“ setting. Why’s that? By the conventional measures (compressed dimensions of the case vs. decompression dimensions), the water tester simply cannot read any change in this rock-hard Breitling Chronomat Blackbird. Impressive.

Breitling’s „Pilot“ bracelet continues the theme of bulletproof steel hardware. The five-link design is robust, finely finished, silky on the skin, and never pulls hairs. Its clamshell-style clasp closes with a satisfying „snick,“ and the impression on the wrist is one of substance.

Breitling graces the Chronomat Blackbird ref. A44359 with an upscale double-digit „Grand Date“ and a high-contrast black dial. Both features ensure superb legibility and reinforce the Blackbird’s credentials as a no-nonsense utility companion.

Inside the burly 44mm Chronomat Blackbird case, a Breitling caliber 44 automatic movement keeps the time. It’s a COSC-certified Swiss Chronometer, and being based on the ETA-2892-A2, it’s also as tough as the Blackbird itself. A chronograph function combines with the double-digit (twin disc) grand date to provide a satisfying measure of added complexity to the basic caliber.

See this Breitling Chronomat Blackbird A44359 in high-resolution images on www.watchuwant.com Video and content by Tim Mosso.

 

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6 Comments

  • Denis França sagt:

    Nice reviews! I’d like to give you a suggestion: you could activate every chronographs when reviewing because we can see how the chronograph works as well and not just the „3 hands“. Excellent reviews though!

    • watchuwantinc sagt:

      Hi Denis,

      That’s a great idea, and I’ll be sure to do it in every future review. These reviews are a bit of a work-in-progress. I’m always looking for ways to improve them, and they’ve come a long way since the first few attempts. From now on, I’ll attempt to provide a full showcase of complications – chronographs and more – for each watch that I review.

      Best,
      Tim

  • Matt Adcock sagt:

    Great review as always- interesting point regarding the pressure testing you use on breitling watches- i have had my steelfish fail a dry test but i expect that its actually sealed adequately. Is this likely to be because of the dry pressure testing equipment used? What is the reason behind this?

    • watchuwantinc sagt:

      +Matt Adcock Hi Matt, I can think of a few possibilities. The first is that your jeweler or watchmaker didn’t know that he must use the hard case/incompressible case test profile on your Steelfish. Even on a conventional Breitling dive watch, that could cause a failed test because the machine simply doesn’t know what to do with the readings from a case that doesn’t budge. I’ve met veteran watchmakers with minimal Breitling experience who didn’t know this about the brand’s products.

      Then there’s the He factor. Does your Steelfish feature a helium release valve? If so, that could be the problem right there. These cannot be tested in a conventional multi-cycle water test, and they must be tested on the machine’s „pressure only“ program profile. At least 50% of the time, even a brand-new extreme diver (>1000M, He valve) will fail a conventional dry test because the machine doesn’t know what to make of the helium valve’s impact on the vacuum cycle of the standard test. 

      If the helium valve isn’t present on your Steelfish or has been ruled out by running a different test profile (pressure only), it may be that the low pressure portion of the test is detecting a leak. This part of the pressure test simulates light splashing or submergence equivalent to sticking your hand in a full sink. Often, the extreme pressure test cycle of a water tester will compress and seal aged gaskets, and the watch will pass that test. But without that high-pressure clamping force, aged gaskets will admit water when brought into light pressure contact with it.
      Best,
      Tim

  • Matt Adcock sagt:

    Thanks for that tim, the test was carried out at timpsons which is a hardwear chain in the uk who kindly test watches for free- the attendent clearly didnt know this imformation as he stated that their pressure test often failed expensive watches. Added to this my watch does have a helium release valve which would no doubt have had an impact. I’ll take the watch to a specialist before my next holiday…. Thanks again.

    • watchuwantinc sagt:

      +Matt Adcock Hi Matt, I’m glad to hear that it was likely a false alarm. When the watch goes to a proper jeweler or watchmaker who knows the drill, there should be no problem. Please let me know how it goes, and have a great weekend!
      Best,
      Tim

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